Customer Reviews for Matthew Bender Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases

Matthew Bender Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases

The most comprehensive treatise available on the substantive andprocedural law of civil and criminal forfeiture.
Average Customer Rating:
3.667 / 5
3.7
 / 
5
(3 Reviews) 3
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Breakdown 3 reviews
5 stars
2
4 stars
0
3 stars
0
2 stars
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1 star
1
2 out of 3(67%)customers would recommend this product.
Customer Reviews for Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases
Review 1 for Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5

An Insider’s View of Forfeiture Law

PostedMarch 27, 2012
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LexisNexisStaff
from Miamisburg, OH
Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Value 
5 / 5
5 / 5
This is a comprehensive two-volume treatise detailing all aspects of the law and practice of civil and criminal forfeiture, including narcotics cases, foreign currency transactions, the relation back doctrine, and post-forfeiture administrative relief. All of the key forfeiture statutes are discussed. Written by David Smith, one of the foremost experts on forfeiture, this is truly an insider’s view of forfeiture law. The first to cover this esoteric area of the law, this book was referred to as “the leading treatise on forfeiture” by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and has been cited in over 100 court opinions. Filled with the author’s valuable insights, practical suggestions, and model forms, this book is for the litigator who wants to understand fully not just how forfeiture procedure works, but how it might work better.
Pros: author is a leading practitioner of forfeiture law
I would recommend this to a friend!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5

An indispensable reference work

PostedMarch 24, 2012
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whitecollarattorney
from Washington DC
Civil and criminal forfeiture issues repeatedly crop up in drug and white collar cases. Clients and attorneys often need instant answers to complex questions. David Smith's treatise is the one indispensable reference work in this area that I keep by my desk. Every time I have consulted it with respect to a forfeiture issue, the treatise has either provided an answer or pointed me in the right direction. It is comprehensive and regularly updated.
Pros: comprehensive, authoritative, easy to use
I would recommend this to a friend!
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0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases
Overall rating 
1 / 5
1 / 5

An Inordinately Expensive Op-Ed

PostedMarch 13, 2012
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Disappointed
from New York, NY
Quality 
1 / 5
1 / 5
Value 
1 / 5
1 / 5
It is both baffling and disappointing that this work passes for a treatise. Rather than a systematic, objective presentation of the law, the author presents what otherwise would be useful information as an ugly hybrid of legal research and a whiny op-ed barely worthy of a high-school newspaper.
Rather than leaving his skewed, poorly reasoned (if at all) objections and ad hominem attacks to a more appropriate forum -- or even relegating them to footnotes -- the author makes not the slightest pretense at objectivity in presenting the material. And his righteous indignation is so in-your-face and slanted that it makes you question the reliability of everything else he writes -- which is truly a shame given the scope of the text and the effort it must have entailed.
The red flags already jump out from the Preface, where the author states that dispensing with objective analysis in favor of his personal criticisms represents the "highest purpose of legal scholarship." I hope I don't need to explain to lawyers why that statement is problematic.
Keeping in mind that this is a "treatise" and not an op-ed, evaluate for yourself just one of the countless examples of the slanted and hyperbolic statements Mr. Smith regards as his high level of legal "scholarship":
"Truly Frightening" legislation proposed by the "monomaniacal" DOJ -- which would make defendants' families "starve or go on welfare" -- was "thankfully" not enacted. DOJ statements defending the legislation were nothing more than "Orwellian lie[s]."
(See 2-13 Prosecution and Defense of Forfeiture Cases P 13.02).
Really? That's legal scholarship?
Pitiful.
No, I would not recommend this to a friend.
+3points
4of 5voted this as helpful.